We are all responsible for the slow death of theatre: Mohit Takalkar

By Gaurangi Dang   If we cannot handle the economics of theatre then what remains of it is a hobby, albeit a very expensive one. So maybe we don’t need theatre anymore and maybe somewhere we are all responsible for its slow death. The approaching death of theatre as we know it was the elephant in the room that nobody was willing to address. Mohit Takalkar sat down with Alok Rajwade at The Drama School, Mumbai on the 19th of August and addressed it.


Public Spaces in India: How performance and art can revitalize them

by Zohra Malik One of the most distinctive ways that we choose to talk about cities is usually with reference to how how they warp time, how fast or slow they seem to move. It’s not just our imagination, fortunately, because studies show that the reason why cities warp time differently is because of the pace of social life. The pace at which people move around in their city, their rhythm, interaction all of these make up the pace of social life which is how we identify with our city and…


DON'T PANIC: GST and its Impact on the Performing Arts

DON'T PANIC!  GST and its impact on the Performing Arts Written by Zohra Mallik & Hina Siddiqui The Goods and Services Tax was finally rolled out on the 1st of July 2017 at the stroke of  midnight. After all, our Government does have a flair for the dramatic. But what really, is the fuss and mayhem about? Over a hundred and fifty countries have implemented  GST (roses by other names) over the years and their populations came through the capitalist scourge just fine. India’s version of an…


Documenting Theatre in India: Research in to Theatre Lives

by Zohra Malik   How much do we really know theatre and theatre-makers in India? Documenting theatre is vital. Yet, a casual Google search in all likelihood will yield little documenting of solid value.  Research & Praxis is such a vital strand of the programme at the DSM because it addresses this imbalance. It also embeds students in the living culture of theatre-making and encourages them to document, research and record the work of numerous individuals who stand at the edge of the…


The Mule's Fuel: Meet the ladies behind the scene

Over the past few months a synchronized cacophony had taken over The Drama School Mumbai. The noisemakers do bear a grudging resemblance to the students of the DSM however, and the source of their choral equivocations is the DSM annual student production. This year round, the students take on The Mule’s Foal, a play adapted by Alan Becher from an award-winning novel by Fotini Epanomitis - a story about families, love and the eternal joy of gossip. The play opened to some serious bouts of…


Rooted: The Story of India's Rural Theatre

Indian theatre is deeply rooted, not just in the traditions of Sanskrit Drama as explained in Bharata’s Natyashastra, but also very significantly in folk dance and music, as well as tribal rituals and ceremonies. Post the Victorian hangover there have been attempts by organisations like the Indian People’s Theatre Association, the Progressive Writer’s Association and the Youth Cultural Institute (none by the government) to rescue vernacular theatre from the shadow of the proscenium-based…


2016's Biggest Theatre Moments

The creative industry is always in flux. So much so that it is easy to be unaware of the passage of time. Which is why we decided to talk to prominent theatre-makers from India and abroad to get some of 2016's biggest Theatre Moments down for you. Here you'll find news, unmissable events, productions and collaborations that transpired in 2016. India Theatre Strikes the Hinterlands Few organizations can claim to have singlehandedly galvanized the theatre scene in a city. Rangashakara is one of…


Exploring Childhood through Theatre

Childhood has an intrinsic propensity towards theatre - children perform the roles of adults that surround them and even develop make-believe friends. These friends become the co-actors of their internal worlds during play. The crossroad where childhood and theatre intersect gives rise to imagination, lateral thinking and ideation. In a world threatened by passive absorption of content, theatre has the power to breed a generation of idea-generators to power every walk of life. And watching…


The Play of Movement and Theatre

The need to tell a story, to imitate, to play and to perform repeated acts that ensure a smooth continuation of a community are so vital and important to the human psyche, that cultures everywhere in the world have developed some form of enactments. Peter L. Berger says human life is narratively rooted. It tends to be the base for effective experiential learning. The art of storytelling played a vital role in shamanic cultures. From a shamanic perspective, stories have incredible power. They…


Theatre in Resistance: Activism, Agitation and Protest in the Performing Arts

1937 records one of humanity’s first military strikes on a defenseless civilian town by a modern aerial force. The perpetrators were the Nazi Luftwaffe and the place was the Spanish town of Guernica. Chances are that if that name seems familiar, it’s either because you are a World War II buff or you’ve heard of Picasso’s 25 ft X 12 ft masterpiece of protest art – Guernica. Guernica, Pablo Picasso on display at the Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain Displayed for the first time later that very year,…